157 The Pharos at Alexandria.

304

Certain full and highly-wrought dissuasives from sensual indulgences, in the works of theologians as well as of satirists and story-writers, may, not unaptly, remind one of the Pharos; the many lights of which appeared at a distance 305as one, and this as a polar star.. so as more often to occasion wrecks than prevent them.

At the base of the Pharos the name of the reigning monarch was engraved, on a composition, which the artist well knew would last no longer than the king’s life. Under this, and cut deep in the marble itself, was his own name and dedication: “Sostratos of Gyndos, son of Dexiteles, to the Gods, Protectors of Sailors.”— So will it be with the Georgium Sidus, the Ferdinandia, &c. &c.— Flattery’s Plaister of Paris will crumble away, and under it we shall read the names of Herschel, Piozzi, and their compeers.

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